Fitness & Motivation Lessons from Pokemon Go

A Wild Pikachu Appears by Sadie Hernandez - Pokemon Go

Unless you’ve been stuck inside Rock Cave for the last few months without an HM05, you probably know about Pokemon Go. As a side-effect of its wild popularity, people have been touting it as being one of the most successful fitness apps to date and some have even been suggesting it’ll have a big effect on fighting obesity.

While I think it’s being a little optimistic to think a little extra walking is going to get everyone fit, it definitely is getting otherwise sedentary people out and moving around – so what is Pokemon Go doing so differently from the Fitbits, Jawbones, VivoFits, et al. that never sparked nearly as strong of a fitness craze as expected? Moreover what lessons on motivation and taking control of our own fitness can we take away from its successes?

Pokemon Go vs. Fitbit

When Fitbit launched people thought that it would have a huge impact on lowering obesity rates and helping to improve overall fitness levels. Gamification (adding game elements like scoring and competition to encourage user engagement) was, and still is really, a hot and exciting method for getting people to do things – particularly in conjunction with the growing quantified self movement. Fitbit ticked both boxes. It provided a solid game element in trying to score your recommended 10k steps per day, providing badges and rewards for meeting goals, and in allowing you to compete with friends, and it gathered enough data on steps, stairs climbed, calories burned, sleep quality, weight change, etc. to be a solid entry in the self-quantification realm.

It’s done well, but it never took off quite like Pokemon Go has. I think the key reason being the Fitbit focuses on gamification, while Pokemon Go approaches things from the opposite direction with ‘fitnessification’.

Alright, I made that word up for lack of a better one and it needs work – the point is that while Fitbit attempts to make fitness into a game, Pokemon Go takes an existing game and plugs in a fitness element.

This might not seem like an important distinction, but it makes a noticeable difference. No matter how many game elements are included in the Fitbit system, your overall goal is still to walk. You can look at it as getting 10,000 points per day if you want, but you know you’re doing it for fitness. Sure the badges and the competition and things motivate you, but beneath that you understand the point is to get you to walk.

Pokemon Go is the opposite. The point is not to walk, that’s just something you tend to have to do in order to play the game. Your goal is to catch Pokemon, take gyms, things like that. The fact that you have to be up and moving around most of the time to accomplish that is secondary.

This is a much better approach to things, because in the end what people care about is having fun. Things like Fitbit, Fitocracy, Duolingo, or HabitRPG attempt, to varying degrees of success, to inject the fun of a game into a productive activity. That certainly helps, but it will never be as successful as injecting a productive activity into a game.

Wii Fit did an alright job of helping people take some steps toward fitness, but in the end it fell to the same problems – the design of all the games was built around making fitness fun, rather than starting with something already fun. After a while people just tire of it and it gets relegated to the closet.

Imagine if you took something like Final Fantasy VII but changed the battle mechanics so that you had to do push-ups or squats to win battles. You wouldn’t play that game to get fit, you would play it because it’s a good game. You would do a ton of push-ups and squats too, not because you think you should exercise but because Sephiroth murdered Aerith and is killing the planet and that bastard has to pay.

Lots of people would probably wind up in the best shape of their lives too.

So, assuming you’re not a game or app designer, what’s the takeaway here?

The Secret to Staying Motivated

If you’re struggling, rather than approaching things like Fitbit and trying to inject fun into your fitness routine (or whatever you’re trying to improve) take the better route – find something fun that also has some small element of what you’re trying to improve in it.

If the prospect of going to the gym or out for a daily run makes you want to crawl back into bed then why force yourself to do those things just for the sake of progress when there are fun options out there? Take a martial arts class, a dance class, a parkour class, go rock climbing, or kayaking, or swimming, go play basketball, or tennis, or even something like tag.

Are these things necessarily going to get you in the same kind of shape adhering to a well-structured strength and conditioning program would get in?

Almost certainly not.

But Pokemon Go alone isn’t going to have anyone dropping a hundred pounds and running in marathons either. Small progress is something though and – unless you’re missing out on potentially better progress by stressing over the small stuff – that small amount of progress is leaps and bounds better than making no progress at all.

Embracing this mindset will make it much easier to continually make some kind of progress in your goals. Any time you’re trying to think of some way to make something you don’t want to do but feel you need to do into something fun, change the equation around and try to think of or create something fun that contains aspects of your goals.

Do you have any examples of other ways to incorporate learning or fitness goals into games instead of the other way around? Leave a comment!

Photo Credit: Sadie Hernandez

The Basics of Programming for Strength Training

Math by Byron Barrett

Strength programming doesn’t have to be this complicated.

A problem I see repeatedly in people who begin a new fitness program – whether it’s strength training, bodybuilding, or something else – is what I call program paralysis.

Program paralysis is where a potential trainee spends so much time working on developing or finding the perfect training program that they either never actually manage to get started on it, or they over-complicate it to such a degree that they start it but then drop it after a few weeks because it’s too much for them.

It doesn’t have to be that complicated. If you’re a new lifter/trainee rather than stress over all the minute details just get these handful of things in line in your programming and you’ll be fine. These are mostly specific to strength training, but trainees focusing on bodybuilding and other aspects can take things away as well.

Practice What You Want to Improve

If you want to improve at a specific lift, you need to be performing that lift. Whether it’s a single lift or multiple, if you want to get better at them and be able to perform them more easily with heavier loads then they need to be included in your programming somewhere.

I realize this sounds obvious, but you’d be surprised.

This isn’t to say that the only way to improve at a specific lift is to perform it – accessory work can have a big impact but it should be done in conjunction with the lifts you’re aiming to improve at.

Perform Each Lift Between One and Four Times Per Week

Particularly for people starting out, there’s no real need to stress out too much over having X number of workouts per week. So long as you’re performing each lift at least once per week, you’ll see progress. Keeping it less than four helps allow for recovery and makes sure that you don’t start feeling overwhelmed or burnt out schedule-wise and wind up quitting.

If it works better for you this could be one single giant workout per week, or even seven different workouts per week – the point is more to find something you can stick with consistently. People stress out too much sometimes over feeling like they have to lift three times per week, or do a five day split because that’s what the forums told them, when they would make decent progress just getting a solid session in once per week.

It’s better to work each lift only once per week, then feel like you have to commit to more and have it fall apart because you can’t fit it into your schedule.

Keep the Volume Up

For your main lifts, the ones from the first part up there that you specifically want to improve on, you want to get the majority of your volume in the 70% to about 85% of one rep max (1RM for short) range. This range should keep providing you with returns for a while starting out. If you’re unsure of your 1RM in various lifts there are calculators online that can help you figure it out, or you can grab a spotter and just test things out.

On heavier workouts around or above that 85% of 1RM mark shoot for between ten to fifteen total reps per workout of those main lifts, and for lighter workouts closer to the 70% 1RM end you can dial it up to 25 to 40 total reps per workout. How you split those up into sets is up to you, and it matters more that you can get up to that total volume in the workout than it necessarily does that you can do however many in a single set.

Supplement those with accessory work that supports those main lifts or hit any areas where you seem to have specific weaknesses. The accessory lifts you can keep in the thirty to fifty reps per workout range. As for weight, for accessory lifts it’s generally easiest to follow the old bodybuilding stereotype and just pick a weight that allows you to do eight to twelve reps per set.

Things like periodization and other fancy programming schemes can help, but they’re not strictly necessary and they can very easily over-complicate things. The closest thing I generally recommend for beginners is changing up your accessory lifts every now and again and playing around with different set & rep schemes while keeping your total volume consistent – but that’s mostly to keep you and your body from getting bored with the workouts.

Continue to Follow a Progression

You won’t continue to improve if you never implement some kind of progression – if you only do the same thing over and over again you’re guaranteed to eventually stagnate.

Over time you should be adding weight, adding sets, adding reps, whatever it takes to progressively add volume over time. In a general sense any kind of progression will be helpful, although if your primary goal is increased strength you should start out prioritizing adding weight / load and if your primary goal is building muscle or bodybuilding you should start out prioritizing progressions that add volume – either additional reps, sets, or both.

Observe and Re-evaluate

It’s not necessary to have a ‘perfect’ program from the outset – but it is important to keep an eye on your progress and continue to re-evaluate things to make sure you aren’t continuing with something that’s not providing the results you’re after.

While over-training is generally not a problem for new lifters, it can happen. If you find that you’re not progressing and that you feel run down and beat all the time, then back off a little on the volume and do a little less until you feel good again and see yourself making concrete progress.

If you’re on the other end of the spectrum, where you aren’t making any progress but you feel perfectly fine all the time in regards to energy levels, then you probably aren’t doing quite enough and can increase your training volume and do a little more each week until you start seeing progress again.

I hope this goes without saying, but I’m going to say it anyway, if you’re seeing good progress keep doing what you’re doing! Seriously, don’t mess with things if you’re seeing progress. There’s no reason to tweak a good thing until it stops giving you some kind of return, then you can fix it.

If you keep these handful of criteria in mind you should be able to put together or select a good training program to start making progress. The biggest thing to keep in mind is that training volume is a huge predictor of results – if you want to get bigger and stronger more volume is almost always the answer.

Have any questions or something to add? Let us know in the comments!

Photo credit: Byron Barrett

5 Quick Ways to Combat Procrastination

Stop Procrastinating by Lynn Friedmen

Sometimes a little bit of procrastination isn’t a bad thing. It can be a good way to clear your head and come back to something with a new viewpoint or to hop over to work on another task for a while.

If you spend hours every day trying to combat procrastination though, that’s a problem.

When you can’t seem to get anything done because you’re always getting distracted, putting things off, and avoiding the tasks you need done the most in favor of other things your ability to be productive and successful plummets. If that’s a problem you face often, a few of these quick tactics to get yourself back on a productive track might be just what you need.

Changing Your Mindset

Before we get into the meat of how to actually combat procrastination, I wanted to take a second to talk about how we think about procrastination first.

The single worst part about procrastination is the way essentially everyone beats themselves up for it after it happens. Almost universally after a person recognizes they’ve procrastinated on something they start feeling bad. They kick themselves for wasting so much time. They wonder what’s wrong with them that they couldn’t just buckle down and get the work done. They feel ashamed over their procrastination, which can just drive them into feeling depressed and procrastinating more, which leads to even more procrastination and less productivity.

Stopping that reaction is the first step.

Even though this is an article on how to combat procrastination, and it’s goal is to help you stop procrastinating, I still want you know it’s okay to procrastinate.

Procrastination is a natural part of the work process. Frequently it’s the result of external factors anyway – boredom or dissatisfaction over repetitive uninspiring work, nebulous or too far-off deadlines, or any number of other things.

Not wanting to do the work in front of you is a valid feeling and you should acknowledge it, and accept it, and not beat yourself up for it. It’s far better to say to yourself, “Okay, I’ve been totally procrastinating on [X Project]. What’s been making it so hard to work on it?” than it is to say to yourself, “Ugh, I’ve procrastinated so much on [X Project]. I’ll never get it done. I’m so useless.”

Now that we have that out of the way, let’s look at those five quick ways to combat procrastination I promised.

1. Divide and Conquer

This is easily my favorite tactic so I made it first. I’ve talked in other articles like our intro to Timeboxing on breaking things up into manageable chunks and it’s a principle I find myself applying all over the place.

Two frequent causes for procrastination are the lack of a concrete goal/deadline, and a task being so overwhelming it’s daunting to even think about starting to tackle it. Breaking a task up into smaller more manageable pieces solves both of these issues.

When it comes to a lack of a goal or nebulous deadline, chunking the task allows you to set personal goals and deadlines to lead up to completion of the final project. Imagine your personal goal is to write a novel by the end of the year. Where do you start? There are so many things that need to get done to write a novel it can leave you feel aimless in terms of what you should do next. On top of that it’s really easy to tell yourself you’ve got all year, what’s the difference if you start tomorrow instead of today?

If instead you break that goal up and say you’re going to write one chapter a month, or even further to 2500 words per day, then you have both a clearly defined goal to work toward and a much closer deadline. It’s easier to see the end of the day or end of the month fast approaching than it is the end of the year.

This also makes a huge task less daunting. Writing a whole novel can feel like such a monumental task you just can’t muster the motivation to get started. An 80,000 word novel divided into a year is just 220 or so words per day. That’s a little less than a printed page of writing per day, I’ve already written double that to get to this point in the article. When a task is that small (do you really not have ten minutes to spend today to wind up with a novel in a year?) it’s hard to find reasons to justify putting it off.

2. Discuss Your Project With Others

Another common source of procrastination I see is a feeling of being stuck, of not knowing where to go next on a project or task even when you have a well-defined goal.

Caroline and I do a lot of writing, so I see this most within the sphere of creative pursuits, but it applies elsewhere as well. Sometimes when you’re faced with a task there are so many moving parts or things that you need to consider it feels so much easier to just let it go and focus on something else.

This often personally expresses itself for the two of us in fiction writing. We’ll hit a point in a story where we know what we want to happen next (we both heavily outline our stories in advance, something we’ll talk about in a minute) but we don’t completely know how to get there. As a result we pop over to Facebook, or Reddit, or remember that we wanted to get some guitar practice in or need to do a load of laundry. The writing never gets done, and when we come back to it we really haven’t thought it through and we’re just stuck in the same place we were before.

The best solution we’ve found for this is to discuss whatever it is we’re working on at that moment with each other. Either by saying, “Hey I’m stuck, will you talk this through with me?” or by one of us seeing that the other is starting to drift into procrastinating and starting to ask questions about the story – “What’s going on right now? What’s going to happen next? Why would so-and-so do that?” etc.

Almost without fail something about talking it over with someone else helps get over those (likely self-imposed) mental blocks put in place as a result of thinking of it as ‘work’. You can do this with all sorts of work, not just creative stuff. Grab a co-worker, a friend, a family member, whoever is handy and will care enough to talk the project over with you and ask if they have ten minutes to discuss it.

Even if you don’t necessarily get enough help with it to get you past the problem, it’s usually enough to get your brain refocused and ready to tackle it again rather than slacking off.

3. Make an Outline

This comes back to problem of procrastinating due to feeling lost. In a sense, this method to combat procrastination could even be considered an offshoot of number one up there.

Either way, outlines and lists are an excellent way to make something that feels directionless into something with a very clear progression from one thing to the next. On top of that there’s something about lists that human brains seem to really like. Part of that is why it’s so popular to structure articles like I’ve structured this one – as a list.

Outlines and lists make things easier to plan, easier to understand, easier to work with and restructure if necessary. It also helps you both to better view the project on a big-picture level and to take that big-picture view and deconstruct everything like we discussed in the first tactic in order to make things more manageable.

Even if you’re someone who prefers to fly by the seat of their pants when it comes to projects, trying to make a quick outline next time you start drifting into procrastination territory can make a big difference.

4. Offer a Reward

At our core we are still simple biological creatures (assuming any biological thing can be called simple) and we follow most of the basic patterns and processes that other biological creatures follow. One of the biggest of these is the reward response.

Rewards are a big motivator.

It can seem kind of cheap to essentially bribe yourself into getting something done, but when it comes down to it providing or withholding a reword based on whether or not you completed what you set out to do can be an extremely powerful tool to get you back to work. This reward can be as simple as a literal food treat, some ice cream or going out to dinner someplace you love, or it can be something else you want. If you’ve been daydreaming about going hiking or playing a new game that just came out, then tell yourself you can do it as soon as you finish whatever it is you’re struggling to work on.

You may think that would encourage you to just fly through your work to get to your reward, which might be true, but that’s okay. The most important thing is that it gets you to do something a little productive rather than doing things that aren’t productive at all.

Which brings us to the last one.

5. Embrace Imperfection

Perfectionism is a parent of procrastination. It is the sworn enemy of ‘finished’. To best combat procrastination then, we need to avoid giving in to perfectionist urges.

Again this might show itself more strongly in creative pursuits, but it’s present in some degree in any and every kind of work. When you give in to the idea that you have to make whatever it is you’re working on completely perfect, you are guaranteeing that you will never be finished with it. If you’re never going to be finished with it, you’re inevitably going to start avoiding it.

Instead of focusing so firmly on the ideal of finishing something as perfectly as you possibly can, get comfortable with resetting your goals to be based around getting it done – in whatever state it’s in – and then revising things after the fact.

If you struggle often with perfectionism fueled procrastination you can even make it a personal challenge to yourself to finish a task or project at the minimum viable level and then go back through and refine it into something more polished when you’re done. Productivity challenges like NaNoWriMo are built entirely around this premise. No one expects you when writing an entire novel in a single month to produce a great work. They expect it to be shit. It will be.

It will be finished though.

That’s the real crux of it. Once it’s finished, it’s easy to go back and turn it into something you can be proud of that everyone loves.

These are just five easy little tactics you can start using to combat procrastination, but it’s definitely not anywhere close to exhaustive. If you have any tactics you find effective for getting back to work share them with us in the comments. Let us know as well if you’ve had any luck with any of these tips or if you’ve struggled with them.

Photo Credit: Lynn Friedman

The 5 Key Elements for Successful Fat Loss

Bathroom Scale by Mason Masteka

We talk a lot about efficiency here – not necessarily because we feel everything has to be optimized and made super-efficient, but rather because a lot of things in life get severely over-complicated. As a result people struggle with things not because they can’t do them or they’re too difficult, but instead because they get too caught up in minutiae to make any real progress.

Fat loss is an excellent example of that process in action.

There’s so much information on fat loss out there that it can be staggering. Should you or shouldn’t you eat breakfast? Is meal timing important? Should I go paleo, eat vegan, use a detox program, do a juice cleanse? Should I sprint, run a 5k everyday, lift heavy, not lift at all?

It goes on and on.

Time and time again with my coaching clients I find people have gotten so wrapped up in all these little things that they completely miss the big important variables that are going to have the biggest effect.

Fat Loss the 80/20 Way

we’ve already gone over the 80/20 approach to nutrition. Most of that will carry over here, just because nutrition is a large part of the fat loss equation, but this will be a bit broader of a look at things.

You’ll find – like most cases where you break things down to find the highest return variables – that these aren’t the big, flashy, cool, sexy, technical sounding things. Sure, it sounds cool when you can sit around and spend twenty minutes explaining the intricacies of carb cycling and gluconeogenesis to somebody, but if you don’t have the boring stuff taken care of it’s not going to get you far.

So what are the five high return variables you should be worrying about first in fat loss?

1. Maintain an Overall Long Term Calorie Deficit

If you want to lose fat, you need to be in a calorie deficit overall. The best way to achieve this for most people in my experience is through creating a small weekly calorie deficit in their diet.

There have been a lot of arguments lately over the whole ‘Is a Calorie a Calorie’ thing. Don’t worry about any of that for right now. If you’re overweight, treating all calories equal and ensuring you’re in a deficit on a weekly basis will get you substantially further than stressing out over whether you’re getting fat calories, protein calories, or carb calories.

In order to figure out a caloric deficit, you first have to know how many calories you need to eat to maintain your current weight so you can subtract from it. You can use the Harris-Benedict equation, the Katch-McArdle equation, or the old 12 x bodyweight in pounds equation, though all of these have fairly high margins of error.

The best way is to keep a completely accurate food log for one week and compare it to changes in your weight over that week. If you stayed the same that’s likely roughly your maintenance range. Once you’ve gotten that rough estimate introduce a deficit by cutting it down a bit and continue to monitor things. Don’t assume you’ll get one calorie number to stick to and that’ll be it – expect to constantly be rechecking and updating your deficit as you see what changes your body is going through.

2. Focus on Whole, Nutritious, Unprocessed Foods

Going back to the ‘Is a Calorie a Calorie’ thing, you find in some cases the extreme If It Fits Your Macros adherents. They insist that you can consume nothing but pizza, beer, and ice cream and still lose fat.

Technically, they’re right.

As long as you kept yourself in that caloric deficit we talked about above you could lose fat that way. The problem is for most people it presents a lot of problems. The most obvious problem is, in general those things tend to be less nutritious in a holistic sense.

I don’t mean holistic in the way someone might apply it to a crystal healer, I mean holistic in the sense of having all the vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and other things that come along with eating your fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed meats. While they aren’t something you should stress out over too much in relation to more important things like macronutrients and calories, being deficient in them because all you eat is junk food is not going to do you any favors.

Additionally, due to the high caloric density of most of those types of foods, it’s hard to only eat enough that you stay under your necessary caloric deficit. Even if you manage to avoid the temptation of having just one more slice of cake, or a couple more beers, you are likely to find yourself going to bed hungry. Going to bed hungry is a surefire way to ensure you’re going to decide to give up on your eating plan.

Can you still have some junk food? Of course. As long as it doesn’t put you over your calories – but I strongly recommend keeping it at or below 20% of your total calorie intake. Fill the rest with vegetables, meats, and other whole foods and you’ll find it much easier to stick to your deficit.

3. Prioritize Long Term Adherence

Which brings us to number three. Adherence.

Anyone can follow the most painful, complicated, intricate diet and training program in the world for a day or two. Maybe even for a week. That’s not going to help.

You need to treat this like a marathon, not like a sprint. You need to avoid looking at this like something you’re going to suffer through for a couple months so you can not be embarrassed at the pool or the beach, and instead look at it as something that you are changing about your entire life. These new habits and ways of looking at things are for life.

For life.

This also means you need to not make it completely fucking miserable.

I can’t tell you how many clients I’ve had try to convince me to let them eat at some insane deficit like 1,000 calories below their maintenance per day, or want some super hardcore P90-Cross-X-Fit-Whatever workout program for them to do everyday because they feel like they need to drop fat right now.

Approaching it this way is like tackling an Ironman triathlon with the expectation of sprinting through the whole running portion. You are guaranteeing you’ll crash and burn, and then inevitably wind up back where you started.

Adherence is probably the single hardest thing about fat loss, but if you focus on making it a priority you’re setting yourself up to be substantially more successful than everyone else.

4. Exercise

Can you successfully lose fat entirely by diet changes alone with no additional exercise? Absolutely.

But why make it harder on yourself?

Do not try to use exercise as a way to create a substantial calorie deficit or as a way to ‘work off’ the extra stuff you ate that you shouldn’t have or as a way to ‘earn’ that pint of ice cream you want to have. It doesn’t work that way.

You should use exercise for two things – the first is to add and maintain muscle mass for a passive benefit to your metabolism and your overall calorie burn throughout the day, and the second is as a way to subtly help ensure that the deficit you created is in fact a deficit given the potential inaccuracy of those calculations you did.

Note here that when I say exercise, that might mean walking the dog everyday. That might mean playing basketball, soccer, tennis, whatever. Unless you have some specific additional goal to train for or really enjoy a particular form of ‘traditional’ exercise like running or weight lifting don’t worry so much about it. Go find something active that you really like to do and do it as often as you reasonably can. If you have to force yourself to do it, it probably won’t help your adherence.

5. Focus on Processes Instead of Results

Many of the problems I talked about in points above (wanting to go all out too soon, not being able to adhere to changes, doing unpleasant forms of exercise, etc.) are all strongly influenced by having a results focus instead of a process focus.

What that means is, people fixate on something like ‘I want to lose 30 lbs. by the end of next February’. In general, this type of goal isn’t always bad – but when it comes to things like fat loss it can lead to some problematic behaviors.

First and foremost is the tendency of people to start to get discouraged if they don’t see continual improvements. When it comes to fat loss, you’re almost guaranteed your weight is going to do crazy things for no apparent reason to you. You’ll retain water sometimes, gain five pounds over a weekend for no obvious reason, and other strange things. Biology is messy.

Many people have this happen and then panic that they won’t make that 30 pound goal or whatever in time. Then they fall into stress behaviors, or make panicky decisions, and generally just screw things up even worse.

Instead, focus on the process. Make a goal like ‘I’m going to stick to my calories everyday for two weeks’, or ‘I’m going to go run with the dog for 30 minutes twice a week this whole month’.

Those types of goals not only keep you motivated since they’re easy to achieve, i.e., the power to accomplish them is entirely within your control unlike the 30 pounds thing, but that via achieving them you’ll find that you’re more likely to meet that goal of losing 30 lbs. than if you had made that your goal in the first place.

Process focus will always outperform result focus.

Going on from There

Once you’ve got all these big return variables down, you can start worrying about the little things more if you want to. Situationally some of them can have a fairly big effect. They key is to leave them for after you’ve got these other five things down, and to not let focusing on them interfere with any of the more important variables.

Do you have anything you’d like to add to these five? Do you have any tips you’ve found useful for following any of them, or for better ignoring all the little relatively unimportant things? Share them with everyone in the comments!

Photo Credit: Mason Masteka

6 Ways to Overcome Procrastination

Procrastination by Pete Zarria

At some point or another, everyone has procrastinated. Whether there is a big project to complete, or a new habit you’re trying to build like practice a language or exercising, procrastination has gotten the best of all of us.

Nobody is immune, but it can be beaten.

Procrastination is, more often than not, us taking the easiest possible route. We’re wired to be like this – if we weren’t naturally discouraged from doing challenging tasks everyone would all be super fit, speak a dozen languages and being productive would be our default.

But there are small, easy methods you can employ to reduce the difficulty of challenging tasks and make being productive your default. Today, we present to you six of our favorite methods to beat procrastination and accomplish our goals more often:

1. Find Your Why

Why do you want or need to do this task in the first place? What will be the reward for completing it?

Sometimes we lose sight of why we took on a habit or project in the first place, so it’s important to remind ourselves what motivated us in the first place.

Are you preparing for a race? Want to connect with your German friends on a deeper level?

2. Make it Ridiculously Easy to Comply

Want to go to the gym every morning? Then pack your gym bag before you go to bed and set it either next to your bed or next to the door on our way out. Learning a language? Just practice for ten minutes. And make it easy to practice – have your flashcards ready and in a place where they will be in your way when you go to do another task, like leaving them on your keyboard. If you have a digital app you like, such as Memrise, do it while you wait for a program to load or while you wait for your morning coffee. Practicing an instrument? Leave it out. Set up a place for it outside of its case where it will be safe but easy to grab and highly visible.

The point is, do whatever you can to make complying as easy as possible and eliminate any potential deterrents. You only have so much willpower, when that starts to run out it is easy to put things off for another day.

3. Have a Friend Help Keep You Accountable

It’s easy to explain away to yourself why you didn’t do that thing you were supposed to do, it’s a lot harder (and embarrassing) to have to admit to a friend that you didn’t do that thing.

Find a trusted friend and tell them your objective and agree to do something embarrassing or to donate some cash to an organization you dislike if you fail to meet your goals. They’ll help encourage you and keep you on track, and you’ll have even more reason not to put that thing off.

Bonus points if your friend joins you in your goal. Everything is better with a friend.

4. Set Up Reminders

For certain things, it’s easy to have them set up in a place where they are in your way. It’s easier to remember to do a thing when it’s often in your way or in your line of vision. But for certain tasks this isn’t exactly possible.

For those things, set up reminders. Stick post-it notes in places you frequently look (like along the sides of your computer monitor) and reminders on your phone at ideal times to do this task.

5. Daily Practice

Overcoming procrastination is akin to getting rid of a bad habit and building a new, better habit. To beat procrastination, it requires daily practice. Starting easy, just shoot for 5-10 minutes per day of completing the task. After a week, increase the time a little, but not too much so it wont overwhelm you.

To keep track of your progress, get out a sheet of paper and make a chart of 7 columns and 4 rows. For each day you hit your minimum required for your task, you get a nice big green circle on that day. Post this chart somewhere highly visible, so that you will see it often. Once it’s posted and you’ve started, don’t break your chain! No matter what, make sure that your daily minimum is met.

The chart will serve in part to remind you to keep on track, and part as a point of pride – be proud of your successes!

6. Do the Hardest Part First

More often than not, the hardest task is the one we need to do most. Commit just to doing that hard thing. Break it down into smaller, more manageable chunks and then knock that sucker out.

By comparison, everything else afterward will feel like a breeze to complete.

Getting the big, hard task done will likely not only require the most willpower to get done, which is why you should tackle it first and not last, but it will also serve as a powerful boost in momentum once it’s complete.

So complete that really hard task first thing and make today a successful day. Then, ride the motivational momentum through the rest of your day.

Bonus: 7. Time Box Your Goal

Time boxing is a powerful and easy to implement method to get things done whether you really want to do them or not, and as a result becomes a huge source of productivity, momentum and creativity.

Get a timer, either on your phone or a physical timer (we prefer an egg timer and to just leave our phones completely alone) and set a time limit for doing your task. You will spend ONLY that time doing ONLY that task. Set a reasonable amount of time – enough to get the task done but not so much that you are completely demotivated to even begin. Commit so that once that timer starts, you get immediately to work. No distractions, just the task. As soon as the timer goes off, you are done. Drop it and leave it. You are completely off the hook from this task! You’ve officially met your minimum required work, so get up and go do something completely different. Get a glass of water or go for a short stroll. Bask in your success.

Was this article helpful? What methods have you tried, and what was your experience? Let us know in the comments below!

Photo Credit: Pete Zarria

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